Squash it Out This Autumn

 

By: Kierra Brown NDTR

Squash. There’s summer squash and winter squash. Winter squash is richer in  phytonutrients than our summer varieties. There are a lot of varieties of squash, but what makes squash nutritious? Here’s a few things to boast:

  • Excellent source of potassium (10x more than a banana)
  • Good source of antioxidants
  • Anti-inflammatory food
  • Great source of beta carotene and Vitamin C
  • High in fiber
  • Low in Calories

What do these nutrients mean for your health? Well, potassium can help prevent and lower high blood pressure. Potassium is also important for bone health. Vitamins A and C add to healthy looking skin and hair. Thiamin plays crucial roles in metabolism and the break down of energy-yielding nutrients. Vitamin B6 is essential for the proper functioning of the nervous and immune system.

Beta carotene may play a protective role against prostate cancer. Beta Carotene also prevents night blindness and other vision issues. Also the high vitamin C and beta carotene content boosts immunity and has anti-inflammatory properties. It has been found many people are low in beta-carotene and vitamin C which increases your risk of dementia.

Lastly, the high fiber content promotes bowel regularity. Like most fruits and vegetables, butternut squash is low in fat, calories, and cholesterol. Rich in phytonutrients and antioxidants this gourd is a wonderful addition to an autumn meal! So make it a goal this season to eat winter squash 2 times a week.

To help you get started check out these recipes we made at our Gastronomy Cooking class this month where we provide tools for weight loss, pain relief with nutrition and yoga and healing with meditation. We also made quinoa, toasted quinoa and dry roasted seeds.  Join us at our upcoming classes.

Autumn Soup

Butternut Squash with Pears and Rosemary